Interview and Some Meditation Book Links


WhiteLotus

Distilled Buddhist Teaching From Elsewhere

Five Things to Consider Before Speaking

Now we arrive at another of the Buddha’s teachings on right speech: The five things you should consider before speaking.[v] Is what you’re about to say:

Factual and true Helpful, or beneficial Spoken with kindness and good-will (that is, hoping for the best for all involved) Endearing (that is, spoken gently, in a way the other person can hear) Timely (occasionally something true, helpful, and kind will not be endearing, or easy for someone to hear, in which case we think carefully about when to say it)

In the Pali Canon sutta “To Prince Abhaya,”[vi] the Buddha describes the six-step process by which he, the Tathagata (which is a title for the Buddha, meaning “one who has thus gone”), decides whether or not to say something:

“[1] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial, unendearing and disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

“[2] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, [but] unbeneficial, unendearing and disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

“[3] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, but unendearing and disagreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them.

“[4] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial, but endearing and agreeable to others, he does not say them.

“[5] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, but endearing and agreeable to others, he does not say them.

“[6] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, and endearing and agreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them. Why is that? Because the Tathagata has sympathy for living beings.”[vii]

source: https://zenstudiespodcast.com/right-speech/

Imagine then, with the above rules in mind, that I stand to gain something by personally withholding information. Or, imagine that I know something horrible is about to happen, and I could make you aware of it so the horrible thing did not happen to you, but I do not do so. Am I participating in accordance with the above rules? Or, if I know something I have been told, see evidence of the thing, understand it is evil, and still remain silent about it, am I doing what I ought to be doing in accord with the above teaching?

On To My Interview

Had I been told what all the guests were doing and involved with in this interview ahead of time, I would not have done it. Why? Simple. It is not within my Dharma to do an interview with all the participants present. Why is it not? Would you ask a horse to ice skate? No. Would you ask a master in oil paint to use crayons? Probably not. There are activities that are proper for the person, and there are activities that are improper. If you make a person aware of something that is improper, and they do not fix it, and they know it is not on your “path or dharma” and they do it anyway, is that in accord with the above teachings?

Or, imagine a very advanced teaching. Is it proper to discuss such a thing in front of a beginning student? Suppose it is about “advanced welding” and the student hears you and tries the technique and loses a finger. What responsibility does the teacher then bear? If you think about the above questions carefully, you will understand why I would not have done this specific interview in mixed company. So why am I linking it? Because, for one, it is done. For two, it is a teachable moment. For three, it will allow a person to understand why my book is different when it comes to Buddhism and meditation.

Links: 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYbkrnEJM2Q 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1Qv-iXu5Xo&t=1403s

So You Saw Me Speak, So What?

My dharma is different in that I delineate an entirely new spiritual path in terms of meditation that you might call “Messianic Buddhism”. I was not asked directly about this in the above interview, but then, I have established that this interview was not entirely within my dharma. Indeed, I believe if one puts their time into the actual practice, the questions and answers to the issues posed in the interview become quite clear. There is only chatter and discussion because minds are preoccupied with problems that have been defined into existence by minds that do not practice such meditation. Therefore, we speak for an hour on a problem that we have colluded to collectively create.

Downloadble editions for free here: 1. https://archive.org/details/meditationbooksecondedition 2. http://thebp.site/217103

Final Remarks

Gentleman, it is no longer a stick you should be worried about from the master. It has instead become an iron rod.

JB Schirtzinger

Jacksonville, USA
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Conveniently this entire site is about me. I do some technology, and I do some astrology.